Rationale of proximate cause
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Rationale of proximate cause by Leon Green

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Published by Vernon Law Book Company in Kansas City, Mo .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.

Subjects:

  • Negligence -- United States.,
  • Accident law -- United States.,
  • Negligence, Contributory.,
  • Liability (Law) -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesProximate cause.
Statementby Leon Green.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsKF1254.Z9 G7
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 216 p. ;
Number of Pages216
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6705421M
LC Control Number27018750
OCLC/WorldCa1068881

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RATIONALE OF PROXIMATE CAUSE: LEON GREEN. Vernon Law Book Com-pany. Kansas City, Mo. , pp. , viii. This book purports to be an analysis of the various factors which have made proximate cause a puzzling conception for lawyers and judges. There are several things to recommend the volume. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: On spine: Proximate cause. Reprint of the ed. published by Vernon Law Book Co., Kansas City, Mo. This book purports to be an analysis of the various factors which have made proximate cause a puzzling conception for lawyers and judges. There are several things to recommend the volume. In the first place it is written in a clear, incisive style-almost laconic in places. In the next place, it is an unusually keen sifting out of the meat of a large number of cases where legal cause is Author: Fowler V. Harper.   Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Rationale of proximate cause by Leon Green, , Vernon Law Book Company edition, in EnglishPages:

In law, a proximate cause is an event sufficiently related to an injury that the courts deem the event to be the cause of that injury. There are two types of causation in the law: cause-in-fact, and proximate (or legal) cause. Cause-in-fact is determined by the "but for" test: But for the action, the result would not have happened. (For example, but for running the red light, the collision. Book Review: Rationale of Proximate Cause: Leon Green. By Fowler V. Harper. Abstract. This book purports to be an analysis of the various factors which have made proximate cause a puzzling conception for lawyers and judges. There are several things to recommend the : Fowler V. Harper. Both Leon Green in his groundbreaking book The Rationale of Proximate Cause 25 and Judge Andrews, in his dissenting opinion in the seminal case of Palsgraf v. The Long Island R. Co., 26 had already seen through the facade of the foreseeability and chain of causation tests of proximate cause to the underlying policy decisions courts. 4. Proximate Cause- The cause, which in a natural and continuous sequence of events, unbroken by a new cause, produced the loss or damage. Without this cause, the loss or damage would not have File Size: KB.

Leon Green said of the relevance of court decisions in time: "The decision of a court is no more 'the law,' than the light from yesterday's lamp is electricity." Dean Green died in Austin, Texas, on J Books written by Leon Green. The Rationale of Proximate Cause () Judge and Jury ().   Definition of Proximate Cause. Noun. That which causes a negative event, such as an injury. Origin of Proximate. Latin proximatus (near, or approach) What is Proximate Cause. Proximate cause is an act, whether intentional or negligent, that is determined to have caused someone else’s damages, injury, or suffering. Proximate Cause. An act from which an injury results as a natural, direct, uninterrupted consequence and without which the injury would not have occurred. Proximate cause is the primary cause of an injury. It is not necessarily the closest cause in time or space nor the first event that sets in motion a sequence of events leading to an injury. Actual cause, the topic of the last chapter, is a legal determination used to establish a defendant's liability. Proximate cause, on the other hand, is a policy determination used to limit a defendant's liability. That being the case, we do not consider proximate cause unless we have established actual cause.