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Television Violence A Guide to the Literature by P. T. Kelly

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Published by Nova Science Publishers .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Bibliographies, catalogues, discographies,
  • Performing Arts,
  • Television - General,
  • Pop Arts / Pop Culture,
  • Performing Arts/Dance,
  • Television - History & Criticism,
  • Bibliographies & Indexes,
  • Children"s Studies,
  • Bibliography,
  • Violence on television

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages311
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8617596M
ISBN 101560727004
ISBN 109781560727002

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If one culprit is suspected above all others for encouraging society to become more violent and unfeeling, it is television violence. This medium, which has become so pervasive in the last 50 years, seems to play an enormous role in the lives of the vast majority of people.   Since , violence in television programming has been the subject of legislative debate, congressional hearings, agency pronouncements, and presidential commentary. Most recently, ratings of television programs have been discussed and implemented while other means of controlling the access to certain kinds of television programs Author: James T. Hamilton. "The Case for Television Violence is a dense, dry and devastating dissection that surely counts as one of the most important books about American culture to appear in the last decade."--Andrew O'Hehir, "The Myth of Media Violence," , 3/17/ If one culprit is suspected above all others for encouraging society to become more violent and unfeeling, it is television violence. This medium, which has become so pervasive in the last 50 years, seems to play an enormous role in the lives of the vast majority of people. But who controls the content which exerts such an enormous influence and to an extent controls the people?

The National Television Violence Study is the most thorough and comprehensive study of violence on television to date. The Study responds to enormous public concern about the harmful effects of television on society.   In many cases children experienced violence in their real life and found the answer to that in the behavior of their movie or television heroes. UNESCO‘s survey contributed to evidence that already existed, that violence in the media can harmfully affect harmfully children's minds. The author notes there is a great amount of scientific evidence to suggest that violence on television can lead to aggression and antisocial behavior 1. For example, a study by Jeffrey Johnson and colleagues published in in “Science” magazine found there was an association between time spent watching television during adolescence and aggressive behavior 17 . Virtually since the dawn of television, parents, teachers, legislators and mental health professionals have wanted to understand the impact of television programs, particularly on special concern has been the portrayal of violence, particularly given psychologist Albert Bandura's work in the s on social learning and the tendency of children to imitate .

TV violence and children has become a hot topic -- studies show that extensive viewing of television violence may cause anxiety in children and possibly make children more aggressive. Taking the provocative stand that television violence has been misinterpreted, this book posits that rather than undermining the social order, television supports order by providing a safe outlet for aggressive impulses. Fowles demonstrates that the scientific literature does not support what many believe; asks readers to question their viewing habits; explains that the anti-violence . Each weekend, Book TV features 48 hours of nonfiction books from Saturday 8am ET to Monday 8am ET. We invite your comments about our web site, our television programming, and any books you want to. Author Raj Persuad wrote that television “is bound to teach children over time that violence is a viable and acceptable solution to problems in life.” Time and again television characters face major and minor problems, and their solutions invariably involve violence because violence is more fun to watch than passive mediation.